Industrialization Impacted Population Growth In Great Britain

Industrialization has greatly impacted population growth throughout the world. This is especially true in Great Britain, the birthplace of industrialization. After analyzing data, it is clear that the British Industrial Revolution caused its population to steadily increase. When comparing the birth and death rates of developed and less developed countries, they were nearly identical until 1875. After this, developed countries had a lower birth and death rate. With the beginning of the second industrial revolution, living standards improved. As cities became more advanced, the death rate continued to drop. The drop in birth rate can also be linked to industrialization. In the past, people saw children as workers. If the family lived on a farm, the children were expected to help in the fields. Families had many children to help with chores but, because of the poor living and health conditions of the time, many children passed away. Due to their chilpopgrowthnatincrd’s death, the family would have another child to help out. Once industrialization began, families flocked to the cities. Children were no longer needed for labor so, family sizes slowly began to drop. Although families grew smaller, overall population increased due to the similar decrease in death rate.

As factories were built, both the CO2 emission and population grew dramatically higher. England was the first country to display these findings. Around 1870, the population began to spike and soon after, CO2 emission began to rise. The British Industrial Revolution is the main cause of this change. The population transformed to become more dense in cities. The great migration from the countryside to crowded graphLondon flats caused many problems. Living conditions were inadequate causing the spread of many diseases. The water and food supply were unsanitary. These conditions forced medical advancements to take place, later improving life expectancy both in Britain and throughout the world. When looking at how the world population has changed, it appears to dramatically increase as countries begin to industrialize. This can only be explained through the many improvements made during industrialization.

Leonard Deming explains the changes from industrialization in his song, Something New Starts Everyday. “The old folks died and left the world’s riot” (Deming, 33). This line songsuggests that because of industrialization, the average age of death increased. In Deming’s song, death is seen as a peaceful state whereas before, death was unwelcome. The rise in life expectancy after the British Industrial Revolution later increased the overall population of Britain. In order for the Industrial Revolution to thrive, transportation of goods was vital. In Thomas Hardy’s book, Under the Greenwood Tree, the word “tranter” was often used. A tranter is someone who does jobs, often relating to transportation. Hardy lived through the British Industrialization and the many changes which came with it. This book was written in the heart of this era. When comparing the words “life” and “death, the word “life” is used more than twice the amount of “death”. MScreen Shot 2016-12-13 at 2.27.28 PM.pngid-Industrialization, people were focused less on death and instead, on life. Medical improvements were taking place, causing people to live longer, healthier lives.

Works Cited

 Words: 

Hardy, Thomas. New York, NY: Holt and Williams Publishers, 1872. Accessed November 30, 2016. http://www.freeclassicebooks.com/Thomas Hardy/Novels/Under the Greenwood Tree.pdf.

Numbers:

 “Human Population: Future Growth.” Human Population: Future Growth. Accessed December 01, 2016. http://www.prb.org/Publications/Lesson-Plans/HumanPopulation/FutureGrowth.aspx.

Time: (primary)

 Deming, Leonard. “Something New Starts Every Day. Sold Wholesale and Retail, by Leonard Deming … No. 61 Hanover Street, Boston.” The Library of Congress. Accessed November 28, 2016. https://www.loc.gov/item/amss.as112730.

Images: (primary & physical source)

 Allport, Alan. The British Industrial Revolution. New York: Chelsea House, 2011.

Maps:

 Wasserman, Pam, and Carol Bliese. “World Population.” Map. World Population History. Accessed December 1, 2016. http://worldpopulationhistory.org/map/2050/mercator/1/0/25/.

Social Media: (primary)

 Williams, Janet. “What Is the Implication of a Growing World Population?” Pinterest. 2015. Accessed November 28, 2016. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/383509724498298984/.

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