Working Conditions

The working conditions, as you may know, weren’t very solid. Workers had dealt with long hours with little to no pay, punished for being late, having very few food, and countless other conditions that isn’t found in many of the occupations today.

I was able to find an interview called The Life of the Industrial Worker in Ninteenth-Century England which was conducted in 1832 by Micheal Sadler. In this interview Sadler interviews five people about their work life. Between these five people, they all have been working since their early ages of around six to eight years old and all have worked long hours from very early in the morning till late at night. One of the things that stuck out me was how they were punished for being late, trying to run away, or for not reaching the required amount of work done in a a day. Some punishments included getting beaten severely, being tightly strapped up, and whipped. Some children were also sometimes bound to the owner of the company and had no choice but to work and weren’t able to leave or try to run away. The way that these workers were paid is also different from what we do today. Sometimes they were paid by the hour but for most cases, they were paid by the work they did or were just paid a low amount for the day and for some, if they were late their pay would lower. Food wasn’t as big as an issue compared to others because they usually got forty minute to hour long breaks for lunch and dinner. The only catch was that if their work was too poor, they weren’t able to eat and if they didn’t eat, the food would be taken away. The working conditions of those  during the times of industrialization were harsh and are unlike how they are today.

Today, work is something many go to in order to make a living and be able to do activities or buy things they want. Compared to the time of the Industrial Revolution, working conditions have changed drastically. Now workers get time off, decent hourly wages, better work hours, and many others. However, in a recent article I found about Blue Apron, warehouse workers are complaining that they are experiencing chaotic and violent working conditions. Blue apron is a subscription box that sends ingredients and recipe cards to customers that subscribe to it. This company plans to surpass $1 billion in the next year and the demand for these boxes are putting pressure on the workers. According to the employees, they have reported of being injured by using equipment they weren’t certified to use, having various threats including: bombs, assaults, and weapons, and reports of being choked, bitten or punched. With the high pressure, more staff was wanted and the company hired many workers that came from agencies where they weren’t background checked or didn’t abide by their policies. This event relates back to the working conditions during the Industrial Revolution because of the fact that because the companies are under pressure, they tend to do things out of the ordinary. However, back then it was normal but now most of those things are considered a crime. This shows that even though the revolution is over, some of it an still linger on today.

Del Col, Laura. “The Life of the Industrial Worker in Nineteenth-Century England.” Victorian Web. West Virginia University, n.d. Web. 05 Apr. 2017.  http://www.victorianweb.org/history/workers1.html

Kosoff, Maya. “Blue Apron Warehouse Employees Complain of Chaotic, Violent Working Conditions.” The Hive. Vanity Fair, 03 Oct. 2016. Web. 05 Apr. 2017. http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2016/10/blue-apron-warehouse-employees-complain-of-chaotic-violent-working-conditions

 

 

 

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